Past Brown Bags

  • The Red Cinder Ecoroof: Non-irrigated vegetated roof system for dry summer climates

    Date: 
    Friday, April 4, 2014
    Time: 
    12:15 to 1:00 pm
    Location: 
    Metro, Room 370 A/B, 600 NE Grand Ave, Portland, OR
    Speaker: 
    Tom Liptan
    Affilitation: 
    LIVE Center

    The Red Cinder Ecoroof design is based on several years of study and testing. The goal has been the development of a viable, non-proprietary vegetated roof that is self-sustaining, utilitarian, low cost and low maintenance without the need for irrigation. The new ecoroof system relies on the resiliency of nature and each part is inseparable from the others. Early experimentation at numerous small scale locations provided the basis to test the system on actual buildings. Four Portland buildings have the new ecoroof system, starting with the first in 2010, another in 2011 and two in 2012. All have survived the 2012 driest summer on record for the city of Portland. These ecoroofs have endured drought with no maintenance and NO IRRIGATION. Modification to the design for even drier western cities is being explored. New test projects are planned for selected central and southern California cities.

    About the Speaker: 
    Tom Liptan is a registered landscape architect (Oregon) and worked as an environmental specialist with the City of Portland, OR for 25 years. In Portland, he was the catalyst behind research and development of vegetative systems for sustainable building, site and street designs. He has been instrumental with integration of these approaches in design, construction and maintenance standards, and city code and program modifications. He has contributed to several books and is internationally recognized for his work using vegetated systems as green infrastructure. Currently he is writing a book about Landscape Stormwater Management, serves on the Urban Greenspaces Institute Board of Directors, and conducts research on vegetated systems at the LIVE Center (Landscape Infrastructure and Vegetation Experiments).
  • The influence of artificial light on wildlife use of undercrossing structures

    Date: 
    Friday, March 7, 2014
    Time: 
    12:15 to 1:00 pm
    Location: 
    Metro, Room 370 A/B, 600 NE Grand Ave, Portland, OR
    Speaker: 
    Leslie Bliss-Ketchum
    Affilitation: 
    Portland State University, ESM Department

     Artificial light severely disrupts migratory behavior in birds, sea turtles and bats among other species. Its effects on the movement and activity patterns of terrestrial animals, however, are largely unknown. Such information is needed to inform mitigation of habitat fragmentation in the face of expanding urbanization. Wildlife crossing structures can help mitigate habitat fragmentation by roads although some crossing structures are proposed as dual-use (for use by foot or bike traffic as well as for wildlife) and typically include artificial light. The undercrossing in this experiment is a bridge structure used solely for water and wildlife passage that has three ~30 m long sections. On a weekly basis each section was subjected to either high ~10 foot candles (fc), low ~5 fc, or zero light followed by a “break” period where all light treatments were off.

    About the Speaker: 
    Leslie Bliss-Ketchum is a Ph.D. candidate at Portland State University in the Environmental Science & Management Program. She received her Bachelors of Science, also at PSU, in Environmental Science with a minor in Biology and graduated Cum Laude in 2007. Leslie is currently serving as Past-President of the Oregon Chapter of The Wildlife Society. She is currently co-principle investigator of the Metro Urban Wildlife Habitat Connectivity Project in Portland Oregon and of the Lava Butte wildlife crossings monitoring project on US HWY 97. Her dissertation work has focused on issues of habitat connectivity and roads as barriers to wildlife movement. She is excited to be continuing this work on a variety of scales, from neighborhood to region to statewide and beyond.
  • Endangered freshwater amphipods in the Portland area? The story of a little-known endemic species

    Date: 
    Friday, January 3, 2014
    Time: 
    12:15 to 1:00 pm
    Location: 
    Metro, Room 370 A/B, 600 NE Grand Ave, Portland, OR
    Speaker: 
    Bill Gerth
    Affilitation: 
    Senior Faculty Research Assistant, Oregon State University, Department of Fisheries and Wildlife

     Freshwater amphipods in the genus Ramellogammarus

    About the Speaker: 
    Bill Gerth is a senior faculty research assistant in the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife at Oregon State University. For the past 20 years or so, he has been working with Dr. Judy Li, Dr. Alan Herlihy, and other colleagues in the Department primarily researching the effects of human activities (i.e. forest harvest, agricultural production, etc.) on freshwater macroinvertebrate communities and their aquatic habitats. Along the way, he has worked to increase interest in and awareness of several invertebrates that are unique to our area and may be over-looked by the general population.
  • Science, Policy and Pragmatism: Why programmatics should matter to you

    Date: 
    Friday, December 6, 2013
    Time: 
    12:15 to 1:00 pm
    Location: 
    Metro, Room 370 A/B, 600 NE Grand Ave, Portland, OR
    Speaker: 
    Janine M. Castro
    Affilitation: 
    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and National Marine Fisheries Service

    When river restoration practitioners talk about the most significant challenges they face in project development and implementation, the topic often turns not to design or construction, but rather to regulations and permitting.  Practitioners have typically viewed regulations as barriers to implementation, rather than tools to improve project quality. Because of federal and state laws, stream restoration projects must have a stack of permits prior to construction – everything from a 404 permit, to a Biological Opinion, to state fish passage approval – yet the agencies tasked with natural resource management want to encourage and support stream restoration. To this end, streamlining tools intended to get good restoration on the ground, while also reducing permitting uncertainty and approval timelines, have been developed.

    About the Speaker: 
    Janine Castro is a geomorphologist for both the US Fish and Wildlife Service and National Marine Fisheries Service in Portland, Oregon. Her primary duties include developing streamlining and review tools to improve stream restoration implementation and effectiveness, providing technical assistance on stream restoration projects, evaluating state and federal permit applications for instream work, and coordinating between state and federal agencies on controversial issues related to fluvial geomorphology, such as instream gravel mining, navigation, and energy transmission lines. Janine also provides national and international training on geomorphology, stream restoration, and public speaking for scientists. Janine has worked for the Fish and Wildlife Service for 13 years and spent the preceding 10 years working for the Natural Resources Conservation Service.
  • Can you handle the process? Case studies of stream stewardship in developed landscapes

    Date: 
    Friday, October 4, 2013
    Time: 
    12:15 to 1:00 pm
    Location: 
    Metro, Room 370 A/B, 600 NE Grand Ave, Portland, OR
    Speaker: 
    Bruce Roll
    Affilitation: 
    Director Watershed Management, Clean Water Services

    Restoration of natural processes is a primary goal and focus of design in many stream restoration projects. For a variety of reasons, these approaches are expected to provide more effective and resilient ecological benefits at a lower cost over the long term. The technical framework and practical guidance for process-based approaches has been evolving rapidly through both science and practice. Much recent work on stream functions in developed areas has focused on hydrologic influence “up the pyramid” to geomorphology, water chemistry and ultimately biology. However, biological elements in the form of native vegetation and American beaver can also be major drivers of natural systems to reduce the impact of altered hydrology, create diverse habitats and improve water quality.

    About the Speaker: 
    Bruce Roll began work at Clean Water Services in 2007 as Watershed Management Director. Before that, he was the Assistant Director for Whatcom County Public Works in Washington for eight years, overseeing Watershed Management, Salmon Recovery, Marine Resource, River and Flood and Solid Waste Programs and he was the Director of Water Resources and Laboratory Services for five years at the Portland Water District in Portland, Maine. He has served as a peer reviewer and technical consultant for the American Water Works Association Standard Methods Committee and the American Water Works Research Foundation. He was actively involved in the development of the Puget Sound Salmon Recovery Plan, where he was appointed to the Shared Strategy Steering and Oversight Committee. He received a BS in Environmental Microbiology from Colorado State University, a MS and PhD from the Water Resource Research Center at the University of Hawaii, and a MPH in Management from the School of Public Health.
  • Monitoring the Health of Portland’s Watersheds

    Date: 
    Friday, September 6, 2013
    Time: 
    12:15 to 1:00 pm
    Location: 
    Metro, Room 370 A/B, 600 NE Grand Ave, Portland, OR
    Speaker: 
    Chris Prescott
    Affilitation: 
    City of Portland, Science, Fish & Wildlife Division

     

    About the Speaker: 
    Chris Prescott is a watershed ecologist with the City of Portland’s Science, Fish and Wildlife Program. He is involved in study design, data collection, data management, data analysis and reporting for Endangered Species Act, Clean Water Act, Portland Harbor Superfund, and watershed restoration efforts, as well as providing technical support for policy development. Prior to working for the City of Portland, Chris was the Chief Scientist for the Puget Sound Ambient Monitoring Program. He received his bachelor’s degree in Environmental Studies and Biology from New College in Sarasota, Florida, and his master’s degree in Ecology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
  • No Brown Bag in August

    Date: 
    Friday, August 2, 2013
    Time: 
    12:15 to 1:00 pm
    Location: 
    Metro, Room 370 A/B, 600 NE Grand Ave, Portland, OR
    Speaker: 
    n/a
  • Integrating habitat components into trails crossing urban environments to assist dispersal

    Date: 
    Friday, July 12, 2013
    Time: 
    12:15 to 1:00 pm
    Location: 
    Metro, Room 370 A/B, 600 NE Grand Ave, Portland, OR
    Speaker: 
    (1) Elaine Stewart and (2) Robert Spurlock
    Affilitation: 
    (1) Metro, Natural Areas Program and (2) Metro, Park Planning and Development

    Urbanization may block dispersal of native wildlife and plants at a critical time when climate change may require many organisms to shift their ranges. The Washington-Multnomah-Clackamas county area urban development is becoming contiguous from the Coast Range to Cascade Range. The network of riparian corridors, parks and natural areas within the urban area is essential for many species to begin needed movements and range shifts. However, organisms requiring open habitat will not be served by wooded corridors and patches. For them, urbanization's east-west extent may be a barrier to northward range shifts. Improvements in open habitats such as power line corridors may increase permeability for open country wildlife. Metro and partners are taking this approach with the Westside Trail, which follows a north-south power line corridor for approximately 12 miles from the Tualatin River to the Willamette River near Sauvie Island.

    About the Speaker: 
    (1) ELAINE STEWART is a Senior Natural Resources Scientist with Metro. She serves as project leader for natural area restoration projects, managing and overseeing feasibility analyses, project scoping, development of project funding, project implementation and evaluation of project effectiveness. Her ecological restoration projects encompass nearly every ecosystem in the lower Willamette Valley. Areas of special interest include conducting applied research individually and in partnership with academia. Ms. Stewart completed her B.S. degrees at Oregon State University’s Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, and she holds a M.S. in Fisheries and Wildlife from the University of Missouri. (2) ROBERT SPURLOCK is an Associate Regional Planner with Metro. He has more than 10 years of experience in urban planning and natural area land management. His project work includes regional trail master planning, active transportation system planning, site planning, right-of-way acquisition and public involvement. Prior to Metro, Robert worked in Managua, Nicaragua as an Afro-Caribbean music promoter, high school teacher and restorer of liberation theology-themed murals. He holds a B.A. in geography and urban studies from Macalester College, and has completed graduate coursework in urban and regional planning at Portland State University.
  • Portland Urban Meadowscaping Pilot (PUMP)

    Date: 
    Friday, June 7, 2013
    Time: 
    12:15 to 1:00 pm
    Location: 
    Metro, Room 370 A/B, 600 NE Grand Ave, Portland, OR
    Speaker: 
    Mary Logalbo
    Affilitation: 
    West Multnomah Soil & Water Conservation District, Urban Conservationist

    Portland Urban Meadowscaping Pilot (PUMP) is a collaborative effort to develop lawn replacement recommendations to increase storm water infiltration and wildlife habitat in Portland's urban landscape. As homeowners become more aware of the environmental impacts of their landscape choices, naturescaping programs are receiving more requests for lawn replacement options. Although common, lawns provide little benefit to storm water infiltration, water quality, or wildlife habitat and require polluting inputs such as fertilizers and mowing. The goal of PUMP is to provide public education, technical support and assistance with the planning, planting and monitoring of meadowscapes on residential landscapes and in public parks to increase wildlife habitat and stormwater infiltration in the urban realm.

    About the Speaker: 
    Mary Logalbo has been working as a conservation planner with Soil & Water Conservation Districts in Oregon for the past seven years with an emphasis on native plant restoration, invasive species control and environmental education. Mary received her Bachelor of Science in Environmental Science from Plattsburgh State University (PSU) in northern New York. She had the opportunity to study abroad in Queensland, Australia and completed research projects on the Great Barrier Reef and tropical rainforests of Cairns. After graduating from PSU, Mary worked as the Executive Director of the Au Sable River Association (ASRA), a non-profit watershed organization. Mary also served as a Technical Research Specialist for the Northwest Service Academy’s AmeriCorps program and has worked on biodynamic organic farms. Mary currently works as the Urban Conservationist with the West Multnomah Soil & Water Conservation District and coordinates the District’s invasive species and urban habitat restoration programs. When Mary is not at work she can be found enjoying the great outdoors on her bike, skis, raft or gardening in her yard.
  • Using evolving data sets and a GIS model to create a living Natural Resources Master Plan for restoration in the City of Gresham

    Date: 
    Friday, May 3, 2013
    Time: 
    12:15 to 1:00 pm
    Location: 
    Metro, Room 370 A/B, 600 NE Grand Ave, Portland, OR
    Speaker: 
    Kathy Majidi
    Affilitation: 
    City of Gresham, Department of Environmental Services

     In an effort to more systematically track restoration needs and inform restoration investment decisions, the City of Gresham's Natural Resources Program developed a "living" Natural Resources Master Plan that continually incorporates new survey data to update prioritization of protection and restoration needs for wetlands, streams, and publicly owned natural areas within the current city and future annexation areas. The master plan structure provides a method for comparing opportunities across the three watersheds in Gresham, and for comparing opportunities within a particular watershed. This GIS-based restoration planning approach maintains a current natural resources inventory and needs assessment, updated as new digitized data are created.

    About the Speaker: 
    Kathy Majidi has been with the City of Gresham’s Department of Environmental Services for 12 years, in part working to understand and convey the value of local urban habitat resources in the context of larger-scale conversation planning decisions. She has built partnerships with resource agencies, neighboring jurisdictions, volunteers, community groups, and non-profits to catalogue and track species, habitat, and stream conditions to inform public policy decision-making. She initially worked with Gresham GIS staff, AmeriCorps volunteers, and consultants to create a GIS-based model for prioritizing riparian areas for revegetation needed to reduce local stream temperatures, and has continued since to increase use of GIS modeling and spatial biodiversity and stream survey data in scoping and prioritizing stream and wetland restoration projects.
  • Citizen-science shows urban streams can sustain threatened native freshwater mussel populations

    Date: 
    Friday, April 5, 2013
    Time: 
    12:15 to 1:00 pm
    Location: 
    Metro, Room 370 A/B, 600 NE Grand Ave, Portland, OR
    Speaker: 
    Celeste Mazzacano
    Affilitation: 
    Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation, Aquatic Program

    Freshwater mussels are the most at-risk animals in North America. Although they play critical ecological roles in aquatic habitats and their life history is closely tied to native fish, relatively little is known about mussel populations in the Northwest. The role of urbanized watersheds as a refuge has not been generally assessed and reproductive status and connectivity of populations in Portland-area watersheds is unknown. Xerces Society, Johnson Creek Watershed Council, and City of Gresham used volunteer-based surveys to conduct an extensive assessment of freshwater mussels in Johnson Creek and selected tributaries. Despite multiple impairments, the watershed supports substantial numbers of western pearlshells (Margaritifera falcata) and floaters (Anodonta). Most are older and of similar age cohorts, but young mussels were also found. The upper watershed has more and larger mussel beds, but mussels persisted in some more degraded reaches in the lower watershed.

    About the Speaker: 
    Celeste Mazzacano is the Staff Scientist and Aquatic Program Director for the Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation. She is also the Project Coordinator for the Migratory Dragonfly Partnership and Editor in Chief of Argia, the news journal of the Dragonfly Society of the Americas. She has a PhD in Entomology from the University of Minnesota, and has over 17 years of experience in education, conservation, and research, including extensive work in stream and wetland invertebrates, natural resource education and citizen science, and surveys, status reviews, and management plans for rare and threatened aquatic invertebrates. She can often be found with a net in her hands and up to her knees in water.
  • The adaptation of environmental governance

    Date: 
    Friday, November 9, 2012
    Time: 
    12:15 to 1:00 pm
    Location: 
    Metro, Room 370 A/B, 600 NE Grand Ave, Portland, OR
    Speaker: 
    Paul Schmidt, PhD Researcher
    Affilitation: 
    University of Queensland, School of Geography, Planning and Environmental Management

    The increasing popularity of ‘adaptation’ calls for an examination of flexibility and change within environmental planning and governance. This presentation shares preliminary analysis from a comparative study of urban biodiversity governance in Portland, Oregon and Brisbane, Australia. The study examined the role of flexibility in changes to environmental governance in both cities over the period 1991-2011. The research entailed interviews with actors in both cities and analysis of organizational and policy documents. Preliminary analysis has revealed that formal processes for change - such as adaptive management - were most clearly present in smaller-scale changes. Formal processes that influenced large-scale shifts tended to be those that contributed to the argument for change (e.g. mapping projects) or influenced the way large-scale shifts were implemented (e.g. participatory forums).

    About the Speaker: 
    Paul is a Doctoral Student and Teaching Assistant in environmental planning and governance at the University of Queensland, Brisbane Australia. He was a visiting scholar at PSU’s School of Urban Studies and Planning in 2011. His research interests include environmental planning and US-Australia comparative research with a focus on environmental governance. Previous to his studies, Paul coordinated community sustainability projects in Australia for more than 15 years. He has an Honours degree in environmental management from the University of Queensland. His PhD research, which is due for completion in 2013, is supported by the Climate Adaptation Flagship within the CSIRO (Australia’s national science organization).
  • Portland-Vancouver ULTRA-Ex: Evaluating the role of governance in building resilient urban ecosystems

    Date: 
    Friday, October 5, 2012
    Time: 
    12:15 to 1:00 pm
    Location: 
    Metro, Room 370 A/B, 600 NE Grand Ave, Portland, OR
    Speaker: 
    Dr. Alan Yeakley, Director of the School of the Environment
    Affilitation: 
    Portland State University - Environmental Science and Management

     Our NSF-funded Urban Long Term Research Areas – Exploratory (ULTRA-Ex) project examines the role of governance for a pair of cities, Portland, Oregon and Vancouver, Washington, which have developed over the past three decades under contrasting policy regimes at the state, regional, and local levels. We ask three research questions: (1) How do differences in local and state levels of governance and policy affect the resilience of both social and ecological landscapes? (2) How do alternative land use planning strategies affect the provision of ecosystem services in response to different disturbance factors? And (3) How effectively do the processes and outcomes of monitoring ecosystem services provide a usable feedback loop in an urban socio-ecological system?

    About the Speaker: 
    J. Alan Yeakley is a Professor of Environmental Science and the incoming Director of the School of the Environment at Portland State University, in Portland, Oregon. Dr. Yeakley’s research interests span ecosystem ecology and watershed hydrology, with a focus on riparian processes and urban ecology. He holds a Ph.D. in environmental science from the University of Virginia, where he was a presidential fellow. Alan was a post-doc with the School of Ecology, University of Georgia, before obtaining a faculty position at PSU. He has published articles in a variety of ecological science journals such as BioScience, Ecosystems, Ecology, Biogeochemistry and Landscape Ecology. He is a lead- or co-PI on several NSF and USFS research grants in urban ecosystem ecology and management. Alan is also a member of the editorial board of Écoscience, an international journal of ecology, and of the IMST (Independent Multidisciplinary Science Team) for the State of Oregon.
  • Young tree monitoring: metrics for planting program success and fodder for long-range planning

    Date: 
    Friday, August 3, 2012
    Time: 
    12:15 to 1:00 pm
    Location: 
    Metro, Room 370 A/B, 600 NE Grand Ave, Portland, OR
    Speaker: 
    Jennifer Karps, Grey to Green Canopy Coordinator
    Affilitation: 
    City of Portland - Bureau of Environmental Services

    In 2008, the City of Portland Environmental Services bureau embarked on an ambitious tree-planting effort with city, state, and nonprofit partners.  Three years in, this Grey to Green initiative has helped plant two-thirds of the 26,000+ newest members of Portland’s urban forest.  These trees will help improve community livability and watershed health while contributing to clean rivers and the city’s 33% tree canopy cover goal.  Post-planting monitoring programs help measure program success and provide the basis for estimating future canopy benefit from today’s planting investment.  Trees planted by Friends of Trees (FOT) volunteers were inspected by FOT volunteers twice during the summer following planting.  Trees planted by city contractors were assessed by city staff in late summer for two years following planting.  Data collected include species, planting location, site conditions, and condition rating.  Based on Friends of Tr

    About the Speaker: 
    Jennifer Karps has an M.S. in biogeography and over fifteen years’ academic and practical experience in plant ecology, environmental science, and forest dynamics with a focus on urban environments. Since 2002, Jennifer has developed and supported programs for the City of Portland’s Urban Forestry and Watershed Revegetation groups. She currently leads an education-based tree planting program as part of the city’s Grey-to-Green initiative. In addition, Jennifer teaches in the Geography Department at Portland State University.
  • Non-native magnificent bryozoans (Pectinatella magnifica): increased occurrence in the Pacific NW?

    Date: 
    Friday, June 1, 2012
    Time: 
    12:15 to 1:00 pm
    Location: 
    Metro, Room 370 A/B, 600 NE Grand Ave, Portland, OR
    Speaker: 
    Briita Orwick
    Affilitation: 
    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service/Portland State University

    In an urban environment new invasive species threats may go overlooked. But occasionally non-native species do get reported, and follow-up occurs. During the summer of 2011 a large bloom of magnificent bryozoans (Pectinatella magnifica) was spotted in Vancouver Lake and reported to Washington State University-Vancouver by the concerned citizens. Subsequent discussions and interviews with natural resource agencies and partner organizations throughout the Pacific NW were held to better understand the threat of P. magnifica as a potential invasive species. Those discussions have uncovered a plethora of anecdotal evidence, leading us to believe this rare non-native bryozoan may not be as rare as U.S.G.S. reports in their Nonindigenous Aquatic Species (NAS) database. Records outside of its native range, east of the Mississippi river, are only within the last two decades. Early recorded occurrences place P.

    About the Speaker: 
    If you met Briita Orwick one year ago, you would have likely found her working onboard a commercial fishing vessel with NOAA Fisheries, or hiking though coastal streams conducting spawning surveys for ODFW. She has moved inland from Astoria and is now assisting the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service with Aquatic Invasive Species prevention and outreach, while earning her Master’s in Environmental Management at Portland State University. She looks forward to exploring both native and non-native aquatic organisms in the field this summer, especially the Magnificent bryozoan.
  • The economics of change: catalyzing the investment shift toward a restorative built environment

    Date: 
    Friday, May 4, 2012
    Time: 
    12:15 to 1:00 pm
    Location: 
    Metro, Room 370 A/B, 600 NE Grand Ave, Portland, OR
    Speaker: 
    Stuart Cowan, Ph.D.
    Affilitation: 
    Autopoiesis LLC

    This presentation will focus on the current "investment ceiling" within the real estate industry and our proposed changes that will redefine the current economics of real estate, prompting an investment shift toward restorative buildings and infrastructure. By integrating complex systems analysis, ecological economics and practical market experience, the presenters in this session will review new methodologies to assess, monetize and demonstrate the value of social and environmental benefits inherent in green buildings and infrastructure. The value captured by these benefits is identified by avoided externalities (e.g. zero impact on watershed) and positive externalities created through the restorative design principles of a Living Building (e.g. habitat/soil regeneration, elimination of toxics in material supply chain, beauty, water conservation, etc.).

    About the Speaker: 
    Stuart has 15 years of experience in designing, planning, and financing sustainability projects in the areas of green urbanism, renewable energy, and ecological restoration. He is the Co-Founder of Autopoiesis LLC, which applies complex systems to create resilient communities and organizations. He was a Transaction Manager at the Portland Family of Funds, a sustainable community investment fund. He served as Conservation Economy Research Director at Ecotrust, where he led the development of the Reliable Prosperity framework for a carbon neutral bioregion. He is the co-author with Sim Van der Ryn of Ecological Design. He received his doctorate in Complex Systems from U.C. Berkeley, and has taught at U.C. Berkeley, New College of California, Bainbridge Graduate Institute, and Portland State University.
  • Now that you've found ivy, what are you going to do with it? Three years of test plots and lessons from the field

    Date: 
    Friday, April 6, 2012
    Time: 
    12:15 to 1:00 pm
    Location: 
    Metro, Room 370 A/B, 600 NE Grand Ave, Portland, OR
    Speaker: 
    Toby Query, Natural Resource Ecologist
    Affilitation: 
    Watershed Revegetation Program, Environmental Services - City of Portland

    English Ivy (Hedera helix orH. hibernica) is an aggressive evergreen vine and is the target for removal in restoration sites in the Pacific Northwest. Ivy smothers groundcovers and climbs to the canopy of trees, dampening the regeneration of trees and weakening mature trees through disease and weight. Seven permanent test plots (.1 acre each) tested herbicide applied at different seasons and compared it to hand pulling and a control at Rocky Butte. Data showed that summer was the most effective time to spray herbicide and after 2 sprays and 3 years, cover of ivy dropped from 100% to 21%. Spring and winter sprays were least effective, showing 70% and 73% ivy cover respectively after 3 years. Two fall spray plots were initially successful, but after 2 years, ivy increased in cover (final ivy cover 31% for Plot C (glyphosate mix), 88% for Plot D (2% triclopyr Year 1, and mix Year 2)).

    About the Speaker: 
    Toby Query has worked as an ecologist for the City of Portland's Watershed Revegetation Program since 1999. He manages restoration activities on various natural areas and also coordinates plant propagation and installation for the program, in which over 3 million native trees and shrubs have been planted. Prior to his time at the City, he has studied Spotted Owls, Great Green Macaws, and Indigo Buntings. He's always looking for ways to improve our natural areas, through research, direct action, discussions over beers, or talks that include music.
  • Urban Insects: the good, the bad, and the amazing

    Date: 
    Thursday, February 23, 2012
    Time: 
    12:00 to 1:00 pm
    Location: 
    Portland Building, 2nd Floor Auditorium
    Speaker: 
    James R. LaBonte
    Affilitation: 
    Oregon Department of Agriculture

    James R. LaBonte, Oregon Department of Agriculture entomologist, will give a presentation about what is largely invisible to most of us—insects that inhabit the Portland metro area. Most insect species are rarely seen, and even less appreciated, yet they are critical to life on the earth: without them ecosystems would collapse and humans could not survive. Jim will talk about native and non-native insect species, invasive species, and how insects are a vital component of our community.

    About the Speaker: 
    Jim LaBonte is an Oregon native and has B.Sc. and M.Sc. degrees in Entomology from Oregon State University. Jim has been a survey entomologist, the lead taxonomic entomologist for the Oregon Department of Agriculture (ODA), and curator of the ODA insect collection since 2004. He is a national identification expert on several groups of wood boring insects and conducts personal research on ground beetles. Through his work, Jim has found several species new to science, including a beetle (seen right) and a worm named after him.
  • Watershed-wide macroinvertebrate monitoring in Johnson Creek

    Date: 
    Friday, September 9, 2011
    Time: 
    12:15 to 1:00 pm
    Location: 
    Metro, Room 370 A/B, 600 NE Grand Ave, Portland, OR
    Speaker: 
    (1) Roy Iwai, Water Resources Specialist and (2) Jeff Meacham, Graduate Student
    Affilitation: 
    (1) Multnomah County - Road Services and (2) Portland State University

    A preliminary analysis of data from the first two years of the Johnson Creek watershed-wide macroinvertebrate survey was performed to begin our assessment of the impact that different land-use conditions have on the biological integrity of streams in the watershed.  A variety land use variables were generated including percent impervious, percent canopy and road density, and determined at four spatial scales for each site:  drainage, 10m-, 30m- and 100m-buffer widths.  Sites were then grouped according to the similarity (Bray-Curtis Dissimilarity Index) of their macroinvertabrate assemblage using cluster analysis and Indicator Species Analysis (ISA).  Indicator taxa identified in ISA as well as a suite biological metrics (e.g.

    About the Speaker: 
    Roy Iwai has a Master's degree in Science from Louisiana State University's Department of Oceanography and Coastal Sciences with a focus on wetland biogeochemistry. His work experience began with Oregon Trout's Salmon Watch program as an environmental educator and volunteer coordinator, and then in Washington with the City of Olympia's stormwater program. He currently manages stormwater and stream health for Multnomah County Road Services Division, and serves as the facilitator for the Johnson Creek Interjurisdictional Committee, which is a forum for joint cooperation on technical issues regarding water quality and watershed health. Jeff Meacham is a graduate student at Portland State University. He is working towards a MS in Environmental Science. His research interests include analysis of ecological data, bioassessment using macroinvertebrates and diatoms, and stream ecology.
  • Putting archaeological animal bones and teeth to work for conservation biology in metro-Portland

    Date: 
    Thursday, July 7, 2011
    Time: 
    12:15 to 1:00 pm
    Location: 
    Metro, Room 370 A/B, 600 NE Grand Ave, Portland, OR
    Speaker: 
    Virginia Butler
    Affilitation: 
    Portland State University - Anthropology, Phone: (503) 725-3303, Email: butlerv@pdx.edu

    Animal bones and teeth from archaeological sitesprovide an unparalleled recordof animal distribution and abundance over varying temporal and spatial scalesand can contribute to a range of issues within conservation biology, including understanding the long-term relationship between climate change and animal distributions and abundances; identifying animal ranges prior to industrialization or habitat fragmentation; and understanding the nature of human-environmental factors that contribute to long-term species survival or loss.  This project reviews the ~2000 yr old animal bone record compiled from 16 archaeological sites in metropolitan Portland.

    About the Speaker: 
    A professor in the Anthropology Department at Portland State University, Virginia Butler’s primary interest is zooarchaeology, the study of animal remains from archaeological sites. She draws on evolutionary ecology to study predator-prey interactions, and considers human demography, technological change and independent changes in paleoenvironments that affect prey abundance. Her work shows ways ancient animal records contribute to conservation biology, which often operates with limited knowledge of long-term biotic history. Her geographic focus is western North America and Oceania and she has published papers in American Antiquity, Antiquity, Journal of Archaeological Science, Ancient Biomolecules, Quaternary Research, and Ecology and Society.
  • Experimentally tested strategies for restoring prairies and oak savannas

    Date: 
    Friday, June 3, 2011
    Time: 
    12:15 to 1:00 pm
    Location: 
    Metro, Room 370 A/B, 600 NE Grand Ave, Portland, OR
    Speaker: 
    Andrea S. Thorpe, Ph.D.
    Affilitation: 
    Institute for Applied Ecology, Phone: (541) 753-3099 x401, Email: andrea@appliedeco.org

    In cooperation with numerous partners, the Institute for Applied Ecology and The Nature Conservancy conducted a 5-year study at 10 sites throughout the ecoregion (from British Columbia to the Willamette Valley) aimed at improving methods for restoring degraded prairies and oak savannas.  Our manager-recommended treatment combinations included the following components: summer and fall mowing, grass-specific and broad-spectrum herbicide, and fall burning.  All treatment combinations were crossed with native seed addition.  As expected, we found there was no ‘silver bullet’;  while some treatment combinations led to large improvements in weed control and native diversity and abundance, the degree of success varied across sites.&nb

    About the Speaker: 
    Andrea Thorpe is an Ecologist and Director of the Conservation Research Program with the Institute for Applied Ecology.  Her research interests include ecological restoration, invasion ecology, and plant-soil interaction. She received a PhD in Ecology from the University of Montana (2006), MS in Biology from San Diego State University (2001), and BS in Natural Resources from Oregon State University (1998).
  • Restoring health at the confluence: a better Slough for a better Willamette

    Date: 
    Friday, May 6, 2011
    Time: 
    12:15 to 1:00 pm
    Location: 
    Metro, Room 370 A/B, 600 NE Grand Ave, Portland, OR
    Speaker: 
    Joseph Richards
    Affilitation: 
    Richards Engineering, LLC

    The Columbia Slough Confluence Restoration project was completed in 2010 by the City of Portland’ Bureau of Environmental Services (BES) and its partners.  The project employs innovative approaches to help restore health to this remarkable urban asset.  Located at the tidal junction of the Columbia Slough and the Willamette, the 12-acre confluence project provides important off-channel habitat for juvenile salmon, not only from the Willamette but from distant Columbia River tributaries, as well.

  • Oregon slender salamanders in Gresham: implications for the value of remnant habitats within urban centers

    Date: 
    Friday, April 1, 2011
    Time: 
    12:15 to 1:00 pm
    Location: 
    Metro, Room 370 A/B, 600 NE Grand Ave, Portland, OR
    Speaker: 
    Laura Guderyahn
    Affilitation: 
    City of Gresham - Environmental Services, Phone: (503) 618-2246, Email: laura.guderyahn@greshamoregon.gov

    Geographic distribution and specific habitat requirements of the Oregon Slender Salamander (Batrachoseps wrightorum) remain poorly understood; however, it is thought to be endemic to the west slopes and crest of the Oregon Cascade Range and is associated with late-successional Douglas-fir forests and talus slopes. Specifically, these salamanders are predominantly found inside large-diameter (min 50-70cm dia), well-decayed logs and under decaying bark slabs. However, in 2007, two separate populations were found among non-native plants and small debris in narrow riparian buffers in suburban residential developments in Gresham, Oregon.

    About the Speaker: 
    Laura Guderyahn is the Watershed Restoration Coordinator for the City of Gresham, Oregon. In her position with the City, she manages 25-30 restoration sites each year throughout Gresham's public natural areas as well as on high priority private streamside properties through partnerships with landowners. Laura also coordinates biodiversity surveys for the City, including bird, small mammal, freshwater mussel, amphibian, and reptile monitoring. Laura has four years of experience in environmental restoration project design and implementation in Oregon and seven years of experience in conducting amphibian and reptile surveys. Laura has a BS in Biology from Augustana College in Illinois, and an MS in Conservation Biology from Ball State University in Indiana.
  • Characterizing emerging contaminants in wastewater-treatment-plant effluent and stormwater runoff entering the Columbia River

    Date: 
    Friday, March 4, 2011
    Time: 
    12:15 to 1:00 pm
    Location: 
    Metro, Room 370 A/B, 600 NE Grand Ave, Portland, OR
    Speaker: 
    Jennifer Morace
    Affilitation: 
    USGS Oregon Water Science Center, (503) 251-3229, Email: jlmorace@usgs.gov

    In order to efficiently reduce toxic loading to the Columbia River basin, sources and pathways need to be identified. Little is known about the toxic loadings coming from wastewater-treatment facilities and stormwater runoff in the system. This study provides preliminary data on these sources and pathways throughout the basin. The cities sampled in Oregon and Washington were chosen for their diverse characteristics, including population density. Samples were collected from a wastewater-treatment facility in each of the cities and analyzed for wastewater-indicator compounds, pharmaceuticals, PCBs, PBDEs, organochlorine or legacy compounds, currently used pesticides, mercury, and estrogenicity.

    About the Speaker: 
    Jennifer Morace completed a bachelor of science in chemistry at Linfield College and a masters of science in environmental science and engineering at Oregon Graduate Institute. She has been with USGS since 1991 and has worked on many water-quality studies in the Columbia, Willamette, Yakima, and Klamath basins. Her current work and interests focus on evaluating water-quality conditions in the Columbia River Basin, particularly "toxics"--pesticides, legacy compounds, pharmaceuticals, wastewater compounds, PBDEs, and emerging contaminants.
  • Assessment of rainwater detention structures for an urban development in Wilsonville, Oregon

    Date: 
    Friday, December 3, 2010
    Time: 
    12:15 to 1:00 pm
    Location: 
    Metro, Room 370 A/B, 600 NE Grand Ave, Portland, OR
    Speaker: 
    Alan Yeakley
    Affilitation: 
    Portland State University - Environmental Science & Management

    Three types of low-impact development (LID) rainwater detention structures were tested using simulated storms and ambient rainfall spanning both dry and wet seasons. The structures included stormwater planter boxes (n=12), extensive ecoroofs (n=2) and a 93 m2 section of porous pavement. Planter boxes varied with respect to soil depths (n=2), soil mixes (n=2) and the use of a fabric filter, resulting in 6 unique planter box types, each with 2 replicates. Results showed that water retention varied from 0% to 59% for the stormwater planter boxes over 72 separate storms, with a median retention of 20%. Lag time between the centroids of input and output flow varied from 1.7 min to 29.9 min, with a mean lag time of 12.8 min. In general, planter box configurations with a finer, less porous soil mix with no fabric filter produced the largest stormwater retention and the longest delay in transmission of stormwater.

  • Pond-breeding amphibians in the city: Occurrence, influential factors, recommendations, and educational outreach in Portland, Oregon

    Date: 
    Friday, November 5, 2010
    Time: 
    12:15 to 1:00 pm
    Location: 
    Metro, Room 370 A/B, 600 NE Grand Ave, Portland, OR
    Speaker: 
    Meghan Young
    Affilitation: 
    Portland Parks & Recreation - Environmental Education

    In 2008 a study of pond-breeding amphibians was conducted in 21 natural areas within three different watersheds in the city of Portland. A total of 59 ponds were surveyed to assess the following questions: 1) What amphibians are present in Portland and in what densities? 2) What factors are influential for amphibians in Portland? 3) How can we effectively conduct habitat conservation and restoration to benefit amphibian populations? During the 2009 season, a total of 83 ponds were surveyed using the same methodology & protocols as the 2008 season. Results from this season included the presence of six species of pond-breeding amphibians, represented by 3 frog and 3 salamander species. Specific factors, such as pH, nitrates, % refuge and aquatic vegetation were found to affect amphibian populations.

  • Turtle conservation in an urban environment via habitat assessment

    Date: 
    Friday, October 1, 2010
    Time: 
    12:15 to 1:00 pm
    Location: 
    Metro, Room 370 A/B, 600 NE Grand Ave, Portland, OR
    Speaker: 
    Rachel Kutschera
    Affilitation: 
    Portland State University - Environmental Science & Management

    The western pond turtle (Actinemys marmorata marmorata) and western painted turtle (Chrysemys picta bellii) are designated critical on the Oregon state Sensitive Species List. Both are threatened by habitat loss and degradation, especially in urban environments where there are increased threats to their survival. This project addresses conservation issues surrounding native turtles in the Portland, Oregon. A methodology to evaluate the presence of turtle habitat was developed after extensive literature review and consultation with regional habitat managers. The methodology was then tested on 36 public and privately owned sites within and adjacent to the urban growth boundary (UGB) to critique its usability and determine if turtle habitat is still intact within the UGB. Tested sites were those listed in a database of turtle sightings compiled by Metro, Portland‘s regional government and reported to various agencies within the past 40-50 years.

  • Tracking the phenological developments of native wildflowers at Cooper Mountain Nature Park

    Date: 
    Friday, September 10, 2010
    Time: 
    12:15 to 1:00 pm
    Location: 
    Metro, Room 370 A/B, 600 NE Grand Ave, Portland, OR
    Speaker: 
    Marsha Holt-Kingsley & Amber Ayers
    Affilitation: 
    Metro Native Plant Center

    This project examines the developmental changes occurring in wildflowers at Cooper Mountain Nature Park. The goal is to successfully implement a program to monitor and collect rare wild flowers for the Metro Native Plant Center. The project began as our Americorps Community Action Project, CAP, through NWSA. Our “Bloomtime Project” aids in the Native Plant Center’s vital seed saving and amplification process by tracking the phenological developments for native flowers at Cooper Mountain. We tracked changes in phenological events involving plant flowering; with observations of interest ranging from first bud, flowering, seed formation, to seed dispersal. We created a straightforward data collection formula with codes assigned to each species, site, and phenological state. Cooper Mountain is a unique habitat with Oregon White Oak savannas and open prairies that have been relatively undisturbed for hundreds of years.

  • Invasive animal assessment

    Date: 
    Friday, August 6, 2010
    Time: 
    12:15 to 1:00 pm
    Location: 
    Metro, Room 370 A/B, 600 NE Grand Ave, Portland, OR
    Speaker: 
    Claire Puchy (1) and Lisa DeBruyckere (2)
    Affilitation: 
    (1) City of Portland - Bureau of Environmental Services, (2) Creative Resource Strategies, LLC

    The City of Portland is conducting an assessment to determine status and threats of invasive animals and to identify and guide management actions. This assessment will characterize invasive animals in the City of Portland; evaluate existing programs and regulatory authorities; define opportunities for collaboration; and identify high priority projects for implementation. The assessment will identify invasive terrestrial and aquatic wildlife species that are currently present, as well as those that might invade suitable habitats in the City in the next 5-10 years. The assessment includes a survey to gather input from regional experts. This work is being conducted as part of the larger statewide assessment of invasive species being conducted by the Oregon Invasive Species Council, and will address high priority tasks identified in the Portland Watershed Management Plan and the City's Terrestrial Ecology Enhancement Strategy.

  • BirdSafe Portland: Assessing the magnitude of bird window strikes in the City of Portland

    Date: 
    Friday, June 4, 2010
    Time: 
    12:15 to 1:00 pm
    Location: 
    Metro, Room 370 A/B, 600 NE Grand Ave, Portland, OR
    Speaker: 
    Mary Coolidge
    Affilitation: 
    Audubon Society of Portland - Conservation

    An estimated 100 million to 1 billion bird deaths occur worldwide annually as a result of window strikes, a mortality rate second only to habitat destruction. Numerous cities have documented large numbers of both daytime and nighttime collisions with windows on glassy buildings. No study has ever measured the magnitude of this occurrence in Portland, and our urban landscape is undergoing rapid changes, with new architecture trending toward taller, glassier structures. An increasing body of research has begun to identify building designs that reduce incidence of bird collisions, and experts suggest incorporation of these designs into LEED certification standards. Portland is poised to join a growing list of cities that require implementation of wildlife friendly building design in the planning process.

  • Lessons learned in the acquisition and stabilization of new natural areas

    Date: 
    Friday, May 7, 2010
    Time: 
    12:15 to 1:00 pm
    Location: 
    Metro, Room 370 A/B, 600 NE Grand Ave, Portland, OR
    Speaker: 
    Kate Holleran & Jeff Merrill
    Affilitation: 
    Metro - Science and Stewardship

    In 2006, the Metro district voters passed a $227 million dollar bond measure that focuses on the protection of water quality and wildlife habitat. Over 1000 acres have been acquired in 27 target areas across the district from Forest Grove to Gresham. The willing seller natural areas acquisition program acquires properties based on target area specific goals and new properties are immediately stabilized to reduce or mitigate any threats to the natural resources and public safety on the property.

  • ODOT's riparian and wetland mitigation legacy

    Date: 
    Friday, April 2, 2010
    Time: 
    12:15 to 1:00 pm
    Location: 
    Metro, Room 370 A/B, 600 NE Grand Ave, Portland, OR
    Speaker: 
    Daniel Covington
    Affilitation: 
    Mason, Bruce & Girard, Inc.

    The Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) constructs projects to ensure a safe and efficient transportation infrastructure. Typically, projects consist of road improvements, new road construction, bridge upgrades, bridge replacements, and new bridge construction. Although avoiding and minimizing impacts to natural resources are integral to ODOT's design considerations, some projects result in impacts to jurisdictional waters of the U.S. and State. Pursuant to environmental permit requirements, ODOT implements mitigation for a wide range of impacts. The overall mitigation goal is to replace the wetland or waters functions that are lost or impaired due to project construction. In the spring of 2009, the ODOT Wetlands Program pursued a strategic learning opportunity by evaluating the post-monitoring period conditions of 29 "legacy" mitigation sites ranging from 8 to 17 years since mitigation construction.

  • Using adaptive outreach techniques to improve watershed stewardship: responding to demographic and behavior data

    Date: 
    Friday, October 2, 2009
    Time: 
    12:15 to 1:00 pm
    Location: 
    Metro, Room 370 A/B, 600 NE Grand Ave, Portland, OR
    Speaker: 
    Jamie Stamberger
    Affilitation: 
    City of Gresham - Dept. of Environmental Services

    Since 2006, the City of Gresham's Watershed Management Division has implemented the Streamside Property Outreach Program (SPOP), offering technical expertise and restoration to stream-side neighborhoods and aiming to achieve behavior change related to improved riparian stewardship. Staff has observed variable response to the program among individuals and communities, demonstrating a range in willingness to participate and commit to behavior change. U.S. intra-census demographic data and behavior data collected from the outreach program were analyzed in an attempt to explain such trends.

    About the Speaker: 
    Jamie Stamberger, Watershed Outreach Coordinator. City of Gresham, Department of Environmental Services. Phone: (503) 618-2793, email: jamie.stamberger@ci.gresham.or.us.
  • Amphibian surveys in Gresham, Oregon show the importance of urban stormwater facilities as critical aquatic habitat for listed and non-listed species

    Date: 
    Friday, September 4, 2009
    Time: 
    12:15 to 1:00 pm
    Location: 
    Metro, Room 370 A/B, 600 NE Grand Ave, Portland, OR
    Speaker: 
    Laura Guderyahn
    Affilitation: 
    City of Gresham - Dept. of Environmental Services

    In 2006, the City of Gresham incorporated into its biodiversity surveys an annual survey of aquatic amphibian and turtle species in an effort to understand which species utilize Gresham's aquatic habitats and to inform our management of these areas. Of the 189 known public and privately owned wetlands, ponds, and swales in Gresham, 138 (73.0%) were surveyed for egg masses and larvae in each of two survey seasons. In addition, each site was surveyed for basking turtles on 4 separate occasions each summer.

    About the Speaker: 
    Laura Guderyahn, Watershed Restoration Coordinator. Dept. Environmental Services - Natural Resources Program, City of Gresham 1333 NW Eastman Parkway. Office: (503) 618-2246, Fax: (503) 618-5927, email: laura.guderyahn@ci.gresham.or.us.
  • Rainfall Interception by Open-Grown Urban Tree Canopy

    Date: 
    Friday, August 7, 2009
    Time: 
    12:15 to 1:00 pm
    Location: 
    Metro, Room 370 A/B, 600 NE Grand Ave, Portland, OR
    Speaker: 
    Mitchell Bixby
    Affilitation: 
    Portland State University - Environmental Sciences

    We hypothesized that Douglas-fir trees (Pseduotsuga menziesii) standing apart from other trees (‘open-grown’) will intercept and evaporate a larger volume of water than Douglas-fir trees standing near other trees (‘closed-canopy’). Existing literature suggests Douglas-fir in Northwest forests intercept approximately 25% of incident rainfall annually, but says little about open-grown, urban trees.

    About the Speaker: 
    Mitchell Bixby, Portland State University - Environmental Sciences, PO Box 751, Portland, OR 97207. Phone: (503) 227-5064, Email: mbixby@pdx.edu.
  • Sediment Source Control Handbook: An Adaptive Approach to Restoration of Disturbed Areas

    Date: 
    Friday, June 5, 2009
    Time: 
    12:15 to 1:00 pm
    Location: 
    Metro, Room 370 A/B, 600 NE Grand Ave, Portland, OR
    Speaker: 
    Kevin Drake
    Affilitation: 
    Integrated Environmental Restoration Services, Inc.

    Environmental restoration projects are often designed and implemented without an integrated, process-based framework for successful project delivery. Much of the available research on ecological restoration is so narrowly focused that results are difficult to apply to actual projects. The recently published Sediment Source Control Handbook was developed through a collaborative effort over the past 6 years by a consortium of ski areas, regulatory personnel, researchers and restoration practitioners to address this disconnect between research and implementation.

    About the Speaker: 
    Kevin Drake is a restoration planner and associate with Integrated Environmental Restoration Services in Tahoe City, CA. Kevin has seven years of experience in environmental and land use planning, watershed assessment, and restoration project design and implementation in California and Oregon. Kevin has a BS in Forest Ecology from the University of Montana and a Masters in Urban and Regional Planning from Portland State University. He has worked in both the public and private sectors on projects ranging from development of sediment load reduction strategies for the Lake Tahoe TMDL to the design and oversight of large-scale restoration projects. Kevin draws on his experience in environmental science, planning and on-the-ground restoration to develop integrated approaches to watershed restoration that bridge the gap between researchers and practitioners. Kevin is co-author of the Sediment Source Control Handbook and managed all aspects of this multi-year project, from field work through document development.
  • Stephens Creek confluence habitat enhancement project

    Date: 
    Friday, May 1, 2009
    Time: 
    12:15 to 1:00 pm
    Location: 
    Metro, Room 370 A/B, 600 NE Grand Ave, Portland, OR
    Speaker: 
    Cindy Studebaker
    Affilitation: 
    City of Portland

    The City of Portland has implemented a habitat enhancement project to
    remove the decommissioned sewer pipe that was exposed in Stephens Creek
    near the confluence with the Willamette River. The project involved
    installation of large wood and soil lifts to restore the banks of the
    disturbed areas. The project also created off-channel habitat in the
    remnant Stephens Creek channel on site. Project implementation helps the
    City meet the goals for salmon recovery and terrestrial wildlife
    enhancement as described in the Portland Watershed Management Plan.

  • Nest-site habitat selection by Northern pygmy-owls in an urban park in northwestern Oregon

    Date: 
    Friday, April 3, 2009
    Time: 
    12:15 to 1:00 pm
    Location: 
    Metro, Room 370 A/B, 600 NE Grand Ave, Portland, OR
    Speaker: 
    John Deshler
    Affilitation: 
    Portland State University

    Northern pygmy-owls (Glaucidium gnoma) are anecdotally considered habitat
    generalists, and to date only a single study has yielded clues about their
    habitat use and home range size. A multitude of unsupported, secondary
    sources persistently avow that Northern pygmy-owls avoid unbroken, dense
    forest, are associated with forest edges and open forests, and may indeed
    benefit from logging. We investigate whether Northern pygmy-owls select
    nest-site habitat non-randomly, and discuss preliminary findings on more
    than thirty nest-site characteristics. In the spring of 2007 and 2008,

  • Management, Monitoring, and Ecological Integrity of Urban Streams: Applying Adaptive Management to Portland

    Date: 
    Tuesday, January 27, 2009
    Time: 
    Noon to 1:00 pm
    Location: 
    City of Portland, Portland Building, 1120 SW 5th Ave, 2nd Floor Auditorium, Portland, OR
    Speaker: 
    Dr. Derek Booth
    Affilitation: 
    Affiliate Professor, University of Washington; Senior Editor, Quaternary Research; and Geologist and President, Stillwater Sciences

    Urban streams present unique challenges for society because they can both impact and benefit the surrounding communities. They flood as well as provide access to the natural environment. Adaptive management holds the best hope for managing these complex stream systems.

    About the Speaker: 
    Dr. Booth moved to Washington State in 1980, and he has worked on stormwater issues in the Pacific Northwest since 1985. He was one of the founding members of the USEPA award-winning King County Basin Planning Program, which successfully completed watershed management plans for many of the County’s unincorporated (and much of its incorporated) area, including most of its streams of highest resource value. From 1995 until 2006 he was a professor at the University of Washington, holding the position of Research Professor with joint appointments in the departments of Civil & Environmental Engineering and Earth & Space Sciences. He retains an active position as Affiliate Professor in both departments and is the senior editor of Quaternary Research, an international scientific journal for interdisciplinary studies of the last 2 million years of human and earth history. He joined the environmental consulting firm Stillwater Sciences in 2006 as a geologist and became its president in July 2007. He is licensed as both a professional geologist and professional civil engineer. Derek’s first article on the effects of urban-modified flows on stream channels was published in 1989; he has continued to study urban streams for the last two decades with a particular emphasis on changes in channel morphology as a result of hydrologic and sedimentologic changes. He also takes an active interest in how we can improve our management of, and coexistence with, these dynamic systems. He currently provides technical support for a variety of urban and suburban watershed studies, primarily in the Pacific Northwest. He is also member of the National Research Council committee that has recently reviewed the NPDES permitting system nationwide and is coauthor of the committee’s report, “Urban Stormwater Management in the United States” (release date 10/15/08); he has also coauthored the recent report to the Washington State Legislature from the University of Washington’s Climate Impact Group on the effects of future climate change on stormwater infrastructure.
  • Water quality in urban streams: Impacts of climate

    Date: 
    Friday, December 5, 2008
    Time: 
    12:15 to 1:00 pm
    Location: 
    Metro, Room 370 A/B, 600 NE Grand Ave, Portland, OR
    Speaker: 
    Heejun Chang
    Affilitation: 
    Portland State University - Geography

    Climate variability has significant influence on water quality through changes in the amount of runoff and pollutant concentration. The impact of climate variability on water quality is not well understood, particularly in urban streams. We analyzed the effects of hydroclimatic variability on water temperature and dissolved oxygen in streams of the Portland metro area. Multiple regression models were used to explain the variations in water quality as a function of flow and air temperature. The residuals of air temperature were used to control the correlation between flow and air temperature.

    About the Speaker: 
    Heejun Chang is an associate professor of Geography at Portland State University, Portland, Oregon, USA where he teaches courses in hydrology, climate and water resources, global water issues and sustainability, GIS for water resources, and spatial quantitative analysis. His research areas include impacts of climate variability and change on regional water resources, land cover change and water quality, use of geospatial technology for hydrology and water resources, and urban flooding. His recent publications appear in such interdisciplinary, international journals as Climate Research, Hydrological Processes, Journal of Environmental Management, River Research and Applications, Science of the Total Environment, and Water Research. He holds a Ph.D. in geography from the Pennsylvania State University.
  • Assessment of pond-breeding amphibians in Portland, Oregon

    Date: 
    Friday, November 7, 2008
    Time: 
    12:15 to 1:00 pm
    Location: 
    Metro, Room 370 A/B, 600 NE Grand Ave, Portland, OR
    Speaker: 
    Katie Holzer
    Affilitation: 
    Lewis & Clark College - Biology

    This summer I conducted surveys on amphibians in 21 natural areas in Portland, OR. This project had three main questions: 1) What amphibian species live where in Portland, and with what densities? 2) What factors are influential for each amphibian species? 3) How can we effectively conduct habitat conservation and restoration for amphibians? To do this, I surveyed each of 59 ponds several times for amphibians and for each of 21 factors that are likely to affect amphibians. These factors included physical and chemical parameters of the pond and the surrounding area.

    About the Speaker: 
    Katie Holzer is a recent graduate of Lewis & Clark College with a degree in Biology. Her thesis focused on amphibian conservation concerning barriers to movement and new pond colonization. She is currently conducting amphibian research with the City of Portland. With this research she is attempting to determine what amphibian species are present and where, what factors influence amphibians, and how we can best preserve and restore habitats to benefit amphibian populations. Starting next fall Katie plans to attend graduate school in the field of conservation ecology.
  • Rivergate wildlife undercrossing

    Date: 
    Friday, October 3, 2008
    Time: 
    12:15 to 1:00 pm
    Location: 
    Metro, Room 370 A/B, 600 NE Grand Ave, Portland, OR
    Speaker: 
    Carrie Butler
    Affilitation: 
    Port of Portland
    In 1999, the Port of Portland investigated wildlife movement patterns in the Rivergate Industrial District (RID) of North Portland. The results of this study indicated that the Rivergate wetlands supported habitat for reptiles, amphibians and small mammals, and the transportation corridor within the RID isolated the ponds and was a significant threat to some wildlife populations.
  • Assessing the value of Portland's urban forest canopy

    Date: 
    Friday, August 1, 2008
    Speaker: 
    Jennifer Karps
    Affilitation: 
    City Nature Urban Forestry

    Portland's trees soften and beautify the built environment, improving neighborhood safety and livability and providing vital ecosystem services such as air purification, temperature mitigation, and stormwater interception. In a study released in October 2007, Portland Parks Urban Forestry evaluated and quantified the benefits provided by Portland's urban forest canopy, focusing on publicly owned street and park trees.

  • The Bio-Urban Development Applied Research Laboratory (BUDlab)

    Date: 
    Friday, July 11, 2008
    Time: 
    12:15 to 1:00 pm
    Location: 
    Metro, Room 370 A/B, 600 NE Grand Ave, Portland, OR
    Speaker: 
    Josh Cerra
    Affilitation: 
    Herrara Inc

    Increases in population and density often result in private development types that stress city ecologies. However, there is tremendous potential for designers in collaboration with the environmental science community to engage in private development projects that support the needs and aspirations of people while providing habitat for nonhuman species. Such ecologically-minded approaches redefine "sustainable urban development." Portland is poised for robust economic growth and the preservation of an outdoors-oriented quality of life.

  • Clean Water Service's new approach to watershed restoration

    Date: 
    Friday, June 6, 2008
    Time: 
    12:15-1:00 p.m.
    Location: 
    Metro, 600 NE Grand Ave., Portland, OR
    Speaker: 
    Bruce Roll
    Affilitation: 
    Clean Water Services

    Clean Water Services (CWS) is a public utility that provides wastewater, stormwater and water resources services to over 500,000 citizens in Washington County, Oregon. In 2004, CWS was issued Oregon’s first integrated watershed-based stormwater and wastewater permit that allows for the trading of temperature credits within the Tualatin Basin. Since the issuance of this permit, CWS has developed a comprehensive urban and agricultural riparian vegetation program that is able to plant over 400, 000 trees and scrubs annually in the basin.

    About the Speaker: 
    Bruce joined Clean Water Services in 2007 as the Watershed Management Department Director. Prior to joining Clean Water Services, Bruce served as the Assistant Director for Whatcom County Public Works in Washington State for eight years where he oversaw Watershed Management, Salmon Recovery, Marine Resource, River and Flood and Solid Waste Programs. In addition, Bruce also worked for the Portland Water District in Portland Maine for 5 years where he was the Director of Water Resources and Laboratory Services. Bruce attended Colorado State University where he received a BS in Environmental Microbiology. In addition, Bruce received a MS and PhD from the Water Resources Research Center at the University of Hawaii and a MPH in Management from the School of Public Health. Bruce has served as a peer reviewer and technical consultant for the American Water Works Association Standard Methods Committee and the American Water Works Research Foundation. Bruce was actively involved in the development of the Puget Sound Salmon Recovery Plan where he was appointed to the Shared Strategy Steering and Oversight Committee. In his spare time Bruce continues to have unrealized athletic aspirations and struggles to race his bicycle on Alpenrose Velodrome.
  • Understanding effects of public trails on passerine habitat use

    Date: 
    Friday, May 2, 2008
    Time: 
    12:15 to 1:00 pm
    Location: 
    Metro, Room 370 A/B, 600 NE Grand Ave, Portland, OR
    Speaker: 
    Elaine Stewart
    Affilitation: 
    Metro

    Natural area managers must balance public access and habitat protection. The very attributes that make a site attractive to the public may be deleteriously affected by excessive public use. This balancing act is often performed in the absence of data that would help managers identify whether, and to what extent, habitat use by wildlife is affected by public use. We sought to determine whether habitat use by songbirds inhabiting riparian forests differed in areas with and without public trails. We conducted avian surveys with a standard point count protocol in 2006 and 2007.

    About the Speaker: 
    Elaine Stewart is a Natural Resources Scientist with Metro Parks and Greenspaces. She conducts habitat restoration projects and manages natural resources on recently acquired public open spaces and open parks such as Smith and Bybee Wetlands Natural Area. Elaine has worked for Metro Parks since 2000; before that she spent 15 years monitoring and managing marine fisheries for Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. She has a M.S. in Fisheries and Wildlife from University of Missouri and two B.S. degrees from Oregon State University, one in Wildlife Science and the other in Fisheries Science.
  • Persistence of Polygonum Cuspidatum: Lessons Learned from Seven Years of Field Trials

    Date: 
    Friday, November 2, 2007
    Time: 
    12:15 to 1:00 pm
    Location: 
    Metro, Room 370 A/B, 600 NE Grand Ave, Portland, OR
    Speaker: 
    Jason Dumont
    Affilitation: 
    Portland Area Preserves Manager for The Nature Conservancy

    Six years of landscape level efforts to control Japanese, giant, bohemian, and himalayan knotweeds in the Sandy River basin have resulted in 90+ percent reductions in stem count, eradication of knotweed on over half of the sites it once populated, and a great appreciation for the plant's ability to survive. The results of herbicide treatments on knotweed vary greatly from site to site. Those plants that persist after 7 years of treatment are small, stunted, and unhealthy. Repeatedly treating such regrowth has produced virtually no measurable results.

    About the Speaker: 
    Jason Dumont has been conducting habitat restoration projects for TNC for 4 years. His restoration work includes white oak habitats, Douglas fir forests, and riparian forests. Jason's main interest is in creating affective long-term stewardship programs that protect the edge/border between natural and urban areas.
  • The Role of Vegetation Fragmentation on Aquatic Conditions: Empirical evidence from the Puget Sound lowland

    Date: 
    Friday, October 5, 2007
    Time: 
    12:15 to 1:00 pm
    Location: 
    Metro, Room 370 A/B, 600 NE Grand Ave, Portland, OR
    Speaker: 
    Vivek Shandas
    Affilitation: 
    Assistant Professor, Urban Studies and Planning, Portland State University

    A controversial issue in managing urbanizing watersheds is determining the scale at which conservation measures should be implemented. While increasingly studies suggest that both watershed and riparian land cover have an impact on aquatic conditions, few investigation shave examined the effect of upland vegetation fragmentation on aquatic condition. This study presents empirical evidence about the interactions between riparian and upland vegetation patterns as they affect the instream biological condition of 51 nested watersheds in the Puget Sound lowland.

  • City of Portland Urban Fish Study Results

    Date: 
    Friday, September 7, 2007
    Time: 
    12:15 to 1:00 pm
    Location: 
    Metro, Room 370 A/B, 600 NE Grand Ave, Portland, OR
    Speaker: 
    Mike Reed and Chad Smith
    Affilitation: 
    City of Portland, Environmental Services

    Mike Reed will present results of the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife salmonid inventory from 2000-2004. Chad Smith will present the results of fish presence monitoring at sites that the City of Portland has restored including Kelley Creek (a tributary of Johnson Creek) and Ramsey Refuge in the Lower Columbia Slough.

  • Assessment of Aquatic Biological Communities along a Gradient of Urbanization in the Willamette Valley Ecoregion

    Date: 
    Friday, August 3, 2007
    Time: 
    12:15 to 1:00 pm
    Location: 
    Metro, Room 370 A/B, 600 NE Grand Ave, Portland, OR
    Speaker: 
    Ian R. Waite
    Affilitation: 
    U.S. Geological Survey, Oregon Water Science Center

    From late 2003 through summer 2004, the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Water Quality Assessment Program sampled 28 streams within the Willamette Basin to investigate effects of urbanization on aquatic biology (fish, macroinvertebrates, and algae), habitat, and water chemistry. The 28 watersheds fall along an urban land use gradient index (Urban Intensity Index, 0 to 100, lowest to highest) based on land use and census data developed for this region. Watershed areas range from 13 to 96 square kilometers and contain greater than 20 percent of the Willamette Valley ecoregion.

    About the Speaker: 
    Ian Waite has been a research ecologist for the USGS Water Resource Discipline since 1992. Ian’s research interests include: better understanding of how complex mixtures of natural and anthropogenic factors cloud our interpretation of stream bioassessments, improving our understanding of habitat requirements and tolerances of macroinvertebrates, application of multivariate statistics in aquatic ecolgoy and issue of invasive species in aquatic systems. Ian has a Bachelor’s in Natural Resources (fisheries) from Univ. of Michigan, a Master’s in fisheries biology from Humboldt State Univ. and a Ph.D. in entomology from Univ. of Idaho.