Brown Bag Talks

  • Cut more trees! Examples of how Metro uses restoration thinning to improved habitat diversity, structure, and function

    Date: 
    Friday, May 2, 2014
    Time: 
    12:15 to 1:00 pm
    Location: 
    Metro, Room 370 A/B, 600 NE Grand Ave, Portland, OR
    Speaker: 
    Kate Holleran
    Affilitation: 
    Metro

    Metro Regional Government manages thousands of acres of former commercial tree farms between the ages of 18 and 25 years old.  These forests were established after clearcut harvesting or agriculture use and lack the typical structure and composition of naturally regenerated stands. Metro is applying the latest research on young forest management to create structural, compositional and functional diversity through pre-and commercial thinning projects.  The May 2, 2014 presentation will include details of thinning prescriptions to increase forest structural and compositional diversity and help create resilient forests in the face of climate change.  The presenter will focus on three examples of restoration thinning that highlight variable density thinning, creation of gaps, snags, and down wood, slash management, and operational costs.  The challenges of thinning in the urban-rural interface and the possible negative outcomes will also be addressed. 

    About the Speaker: 
    Kate Holleran is a Senior Natural Resources Scientist with Metro. Prior to working for Metro, she was a program coordinator and faculty for the Natural Resources Technology program at Mt Hood Community College for ten years where she continues to teach part time and serve on the program technical advisory committee. Additionally, she worked as a forester for the US Forest Service for thirteen years. She has experience working across diverse landscapes and in restoring small highly disturbed urban sites to large wildland natural areas. Kate has a BS in Forest Science from Pennsylvania State University and a MST in Science Teaching from Portland State University. Kate promises a slightly expanded presentation on the topic of restoration thinning to allow at least 15 minutes for dialog with the audience.
  • Improving efficiency of invasive plant management in urban and rural settings using optimized field data workflows

    Date: 
    Friday, June 6, 2014
    Time: 
    12:15 to 1:00 pm
    Location: 
    Metro, Room 370 A/B, 600 NE Grand Ave, Portland, OR
    Speaker: 
    Jeff Lesh
    Affilitation: 
    Clackamas County Soil and Water Conservation District

    Invasive plant management on a large scale often requires organizational sophistication, especially in urban areas, due in part to the large number of land manager relationships and invasive plant data that must be collected, maintained, and utilized.   Here, data collection often involves tracking land manager permissions and preferences; outreach efforts; and plant observations, surveys, and treatments.   Additionally, increased use of contractors, infestation size, and number of staff involved often makes manual data management, including those partially-based on electronic tools, very time consuming.    Newly developed tools running on consumer-grade tablets and smartphones connected to cloud services are increasing the efficiency and reducing costs of field data management for many applications relative to existing tools.  This talk describes the use of one such tool, Fulcrum, in combination with several other tools to create a more effic

    About the Speaker: 
    Jeff Lesh works for the Clackamas County Soil & Water Conservation District as a Conservation Technician focused on early detection and rapid response (EDRR) invasive plant management throughout Clackamas County. He has a Bachelor’s degree in Computer Science/Mathematics and Religious Studies from Lewis & Clark College. Jeff published research on peer to peer networking before moving on to work for a Fortune 500 software development company as a computer programmer and then transitioning to natural resource management. Jeff is the chair of the 4-County Cooperative Weed Management Area’s Mapping and Data subcommittee.
  • Moving beyond the “non-native=bad” paradigm: Examining the relationship between a native frog and introduced reed canary grass

    Date: 
    Friday, August 1, 2014
    Time: 
    12:15 to 1:00 pm
    Location: 
    Metro, Room 370 A/B, 600 NE Grand Ave, Portland, OR
    Speaker: 
    Katie Holzer
    Affilitation: 
    University of California, Davis
  • Tree for All: One Million. One Year. One Water.

    Date: 
    Friday, September 5, 2014
    Time: 
    12:15 to 1:00 pm
    Location: 
    Metro, Room 370 A/B, 600 NE Grand Ave, Portland, OR
    Speaker: 
    Bruce Roll, Ph.D., M.P.H
    Affilitation: 
    Clean Water Services

    As local and federal restoration funding sources dry up we are challenged to find new ways to leverage existing dollars to restore and steward large-scale restoration projects. Since 2004, many community groups within the Tualatin basin have worked together to restore watershed health on over 15,000 acres. The success of these projects is a reflection of a series of innovative approaches that weave community values and existing funding sources together in a manner that maximizes ecological uplift and supports long term stewardship. During this presentation, we will describe the mechanics of this program and the factors that need to be considered for success. In addition, the audience will be challenge to consider new opportunities to expand funding streams for natural areas restoration in the greater Portland Area.

    About the Speaker: 
    Bruce joined Clean Water Services in 2007 as the Watershed Management Department Director. Prior to joining Clean Water Services, Bruce served as the Assistant Director for Whatcom County Public Works in Washington State for eight years where he oversaw Watershed Management, Salmon Recovery, Marine Resource, River and Flood and Solid Waste Programs. In addition, Bruce also worked for the Portland Water District in Portland Maine for 5 years where he was the Director of Water Resources and Laboratory Services. Bruce attended Colorado State University where he received a BS in Environmental Microbiology. In addition, Bruce received a MS and PhD from the Water Resources Research Center at the University of Hawaii and a MPH in Management from the School of Public Health. Bruce has served as a peer reviewer and technical consultant for the American Water Works Association Standard Methods Committee and the American Water Works Research Foundation. Bruce was actively involved in the development of the Puget Sound Salmon Recovery Plan where he was appointed to the Shared Strategy Steering and Oversight Committee. In his spare time Bruce continues to have unrealized athletic aspirations and struggles to race his bicycle on Alpenrose Velodrome.
  • Carnage and Mayhem on the Urban Landscape Part 2: Analysis of Urban Wildlife Phone Data from Audubon's Wildlife Care Center

    Date: 
    Friday, October 3, 2014
    Time: 
    12:15 to 1:00 pm
    Location: 
    Metro, Room 370 A/B, 600 NE Grand Ave, Portland, OR
    Speaker: 
    Bob Sallinger
    Affilitation: 
    Audubon Society of Portland
  • SERVE - Students Engaged in Restoring Vital Ecosystems

    Date: 
    Friday, November 7, 2014
    Time: 
    12:15 to 1:00 pm
    Location: 
    Metro, Room 370 A/B, 600 NE Grand Ave, Portland, OR
    Speaker: 
    Sheilagh Diez
    Affilitation: 
    Columbia Slough Watershed Council